The Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC) has said that Nigerian workers are getting tired of federal government’s delay tactics over the issue of new minimum wage for Nigerian workers, saying cannot wait indefinitely for the government to respond at its own time.

Speaking at the 4th NLC National Gender Conference in Abuja, the National President of NLC, Comrade Ayuba Wabba said that despite the fact that the minimum wage was due for renegotiation after 5 years, the Buhari administration was dragging its feet in constituting a tripartite committee as is the practice to negotiate a new minimum wage.

“Nigerian workers were getting tired of government’s delay tactics in constituting a tripartite committee to negotiate a new minimum wage for the country and ask the government to act immediately.”

  “It is no longer news that our Country is in a severe recession, and prices of virtually all consumable and non-consumable items have skyrocketed. In the last twelve or more months, the inflationary trend in the economy has gone over the roof, and the mass of our people, the salaried and the teeming millions of the unemployed, are facing very difficult times.

Wabba  further stressed that, “Amidst these difficulties, we have contended with a number of state governments that have misplaced priorities and have regularly refused to pay workers in the State payroll, their salaries as at when due.

“Similarly pension, of retired public servants have gone for several months, and in some cases, years unpaid. We have over the last 15 months fought these State governments to pay up these outstanding wages and pension liabilities they owe workers. We will continue to do this till all salaries and pensions across the country are fully paid up.”
“The commitment of the Congress to promoting gender equity and gender participation in the affairs of trade unions in the country. He said: “the Congress has over the past three decades worked to promote women participation and involvement in the affairs of the trade union movement, in industrial unions and State Councils of the NLC nationwide.

‎He said: “The Congress has over the past three decades worked to promote women participation and involvement in the affairs of the trade union movement, in industrial unions and State Councils of the NLC nationwide.

“Against the background of the male-dominated nature of our society and the trade union movement, gender issues are still challenging issues within our movement; women workers are still very much disadvantaged within our organisations. In the world of work, where both men and women are in employment, the chances are that women still suffer more discrimination than their male counterparts.

“From a position where we used to have an almost all-male executive in most of our unions, the NLC gender equity policy has enabled the Congress and virtually all of its affiliates to have increased women representation at the level of leadership in all their structures.

“To ensure that these changes are sustainable, the NLC constitution and that of affiliate unions were amended to ensure the inclusion of women representations at leadership levels.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here